Author Archives: julielnsauer

About julielnsauer

I am a... ...college graduate (yay SCAD!) ...big dog lover ...daddy's girl ...graphic designer ...fast learner ...high heel addict ...perfectionist ...photographer ...lover of bright colors ...painter ...ultimate frisbee player ...family oriented person ...person who sings/dances in my car and doesn't care when people are watching ...sports fan ...lover not a fighter ...paddle boarder ...hard worker ...southern girl ...talker... and listener ...social media addict ...volleyball player ...glass is half full typer of girl

Mani Pedi Day!!

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20 Incredibly Bizarre Vintage Halloween Costumes

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http://flavorwire.com/339253/20-incredibly-bizarre-vintage-halloween-costumes/view-all/

 

20 Incredibly Bizarre Vintage Halloween Costumes

By Emily Temple on Dec 25, 2012 3:00pm

[Editor’s note: In celebration of the holidays, we’re spending the next two Tuesdays by counting down the top 12 Flavorwire features of 2012. This post, at #7, was originally published October 21st.] What is it about vintage costumes that makes them so much more bizarre — and so much scarier — than their modern equivalents? Were people really that much stranger back then, or do they only look absurd in hindsight? Fed up with the animal-ears-and-a-bra option that, no matter how many times everyone rolls their eyes over it, seems to be the prevailing trend year after year, we decided to look for a little inspiration in vintage photography. We scoured the web for the wildest, weirdest costumes of yesteryear, and came up with everything from toadstools to telephones — and one guy in “fancy dress as a side of bacon.” After the jump, get inspired — or totally freaked out — by our collection of creepy, funny, or just plain bizarre costumes worn by revelers in decades past. We hope you can sleep tonight.

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Bibendums, Montmartre, 1922. [Image via]

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New York City, 1951. [Image via]

 

 

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1910. [Image via]

New van Gogh painting discovered: ‘Sunset at Montmajour’

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http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/09/world/europe/netherlands-van-gogh-new-painting/index.html?c&page=2

 

The "Sunset at Montmajour" was painted in 1888. The museum has identified the painting after "extensive research into style, technique, paint, canvas, the depiction, Van Gogh's letters and the provenance."
 Under the cover, a new van Gogh painting
 STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The painting has been identified as a van Gogh after “extensive research,” a museum says
  • “A discovery of this magnitude has never before occurred,” the Van Gogh Museum says
  • The picture is from 1888, during a period considered by many to be the high point of his career
  • It depicts a landscape in the south of France, where van Gogh was working at the time

Read this article in Spanish

(CNN) — More than 120 years after Vincent van Gogh’s death, a new painting by the Dutch master has come to light.

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, which holds the largest collection of the artist’s work, announced Monday the discovery of the newly identified painting, a landscape titled “Sunset at Montmajour.”

“A discovery of this magnitude has never before occurred in the history of the Van Gogh Museum,” the museum’s director, Axel Ruger, said in a statement.

Van Gogh is believed to have completed the relatively large painting in 1888, two years before his death and during “a period that is considered by many to be the culmination of his artistic achievement,” Ruger said.

The picture depicts a landscape in the vicinity of Arles in the south of France, where van Gogh was working at that time, the museum said.

 

Vincent Van Gogh’s lost painting

 

Museum discovers ‘new’ van Gogh painting

Ruger said the museum attributed the painting to van Gogh after “extensive research into style, technique, paint, canvas, the depiction, van Gogh’s letters and the provenance.”

Starting September 24, it will appear in “Van Gogh At Work,” an exhibition currently on show at the museum in Amsterdam.

From the ‘Sunflowers’ period

Van Gogh (1853-1890) crafted some of the world’s best known and most loved paintings, including “Sunflowers,” “Irises” and “Starry Night,” and a number of self-portraits.

He painted “Sunset at Montmajour” during the same period in which he produced “Sunflowers,” Ruger said.

Van Gogh achieved little recognition as an artist during his lifetime, but his reputation blossomed in the years after his suicide at the age of 37, following years of mental illness.

His works now hang in leading museums and galleries around the world.

During the art market boom of the late 1980s and early 1990s, three of van Gogh’s works succeeded each other as the most expensive paintings ever sold: “Sunflowers” for $39.9 million, “Irises” for $53.9 million and “Portrait of Dr. Gachet” for $82.5 million.

In its statement, the Van Gogh Museum didn’t divulge the full story behind the discovery of “Sunset at Montmajour,” saying it would be published in the October edition of The Burlington Magazine, a fine art publication, and at the museum.

Louis van Tilborgh and Teio Meedendorp, two senior researchers at the museum, said the painting had belonged to the collection of van Gogh’s younger brother, Theo, in 1890 and was sold in 1901.