Monthly Archives: September 2013

New van Gogh painting discovered: ‘Sunset at Montmajour’

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http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/09/world/europe/netherlands-van-gogh-new-painting/index.html?c&page=2

 

The "Sunset at Montmajour" was painted in 1888. The museum has identified the painting after "extensive research into style, technique, paint, canvas, the depiction, Van Gogh's letters and the provenance."
 Under the cover, a new van Gogh painting
 STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The painting has been identified as a van Gogh after “extensive research,” a museum says
  • “A discovery of this magnitude has never before occurred,” the Van Gogh Museum says
  • The picture is from 1888, during a period considered by many to be the high point of his career
  • It depicts a landscape in the south of France, where van Gogh was working at the time

Read this article in Spanish

(CNN) — More than 120 years after Vincent van Gogh’s death, a new painting by the Dutch master has come to light.

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, which holds the largest collection of the artist’s work, announced Monday the discovery of the newly identified painting, a landscape titled “Sunset at Montmajour.”

“A discovery of this magnitude has never before occurred in the history of the Van Gogh Museum,” the museum’s director, Axel Ruger, said in a statement.

Van Gogh is believed to have completed the relatively large painting in 1888, two years before his death and during “a period that is considered by many to be the culmination of his artistic achievement,” Ruger said.

The picture depicts a landscape in the vicinity of Arles in the south of France, where van Gogh was working at that time, the museum said.

 

Vincent Van Gogh’s lost painting

 

Museum discovers ‘new’ van Gogh painting

Ruger said the museum attributed the painting to van Gogh after “extensive research into style, technique, paint, canvas, the depiction, van Gogh’s letters and the provenance.”

Starting September 24, it will appear in “Van Gogh At Work,” an exhibition currently on show at the museum in Amsterdam.

From the ‘Sunflowers’ period

Van Gogh (1853-1890) crafted some of the world’s best known and most loved paintings, including “Sunflowers,” “Irises” and “Starry Night,” and a number of self-portraits.

He painted “Sunset at Montmajour” during the same period in which he produced “Sunflowers,” Ruger said.

Van Gogh achieved little recognition as an artist during his lifetime, but his reputation blossomed in the years after his suicide at the age of 37, following years of mental illness.

His works now hang in leading museums and galleries around the world.

During the art market boom of the late 1980s and early 1990s, three of van Gogh’s works succeeded each other as the most expensive paintings ever sold: “Sunflowers” for $39.9 million, “Irises” for $53.9 million and “Portrait of Dr. Gachet” for $82.5 million.

In its statement, the Van Gogh Museum didn’t divulge the full story behind the discovery of “Sunset at Montmajour,” saying it would be published in the October edition of The Burlington Magazine, a fine art publication, and at the museum.

Louis van Tilborgh and Teio Meedendorp, two senior researchers at the museum, said the painting had belonged to the collection of van Gogh’s younger brother, Theo, in 1890 and was sold in 1901.

strategies in Jenga?

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The most unstable situation is adjacent middle blocks, and in general, instabilities near the bottom of the stack are more likely to cause the tower to fall than those at the top because of the greater weight of blocks being held up by the rickety base and because of the longer moment arm.

falling Jenga tower

However, it’s not quite as simple as setting up a precarious-middle-blocks-at-the-bottom-of-the-tower scenario just to make your opponent move after you’ve set it up, as the picture makes clear that several middle blocks in a row can often be stable enough for at least a couple more turns–in which case your ploy could come back to bite you.

One trick I’ve used is to judge which way the tower was tilting after I’d removed my block and then place it on the opposite side on the top. The goal here is to make your opponent place their block on the weak side and hopefully bring everything down. It has the added benefit of being the safest place to put your block.

That said, there’s not much strategy to Jenga; it’s really more about steady hands, dexterity, and being able to tell which blocks are loose. (Unless of course you engage in psychological warfare.)

If you are very dexterous, and are playing with players that are also very dexterous, realize that the math of your choices can determine who wins. Each level can have either 1 or 2 removed from it. Try to leave your opponent(s) in a situation where they have no possible moves.

For example, if there is 1 full level, and 1 level with the middle and 1 side, and you are playing with only 1 other player, remove one of the outer pieces from the full level. This will leave 2 pieces, one for your opponent and one for you. But if you are playing with more than 1 opponent, remove the middle piece from the full level, so that the pieces will run out before it gets back to you.

How to beat anyone at jenga!

This article was taken from the July 2011 issue of Wired magazine. Be the first to read Wired’s articles in print before they’re posted online, and get your hands on loads of additional content by subscribing online.

Leslie Scott created the game 30 years ago (the name comes from the Swahili for “to build”). Here she explains how to get the upper hand.

▲ TAKE YOUR TIME

Don’t rush yourself. “With Jenga, you lose it rather than win it,” says Scott. Feel for easy bricks and forget those that feel stuck — they might loosen up later as the weight distribution changes.

▲ ▲ FORGET STRATEGY Concentrate on individual moves, rather than deploying a strategy. “Each brick is a slightly different size and weight, so every time you assemble a tower of bricks it’s a different game.”

▲ ▲ ▲ AVOID GOING CO-OPERATIVE

Don’t get sucked into building a tall tower. “People want to get the tower as high as possible and it becomes a co-operative,” Scott says. The higher it gets, the greater the likelihood it will be unstable.

▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ GET DEXTEROUS

“The rules say you can only use one hand at a time but that doesn’t mean you can’t swap hands,” says Scott. “Also, you can balance the tower against your forearm, using your arm as a brace.”

▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ MANIPULATE THE TOWER

“Even if there appears not to be a brick available, there might be,” Scott says. “If there’s a layer where the centre brick has been removed, pinch together the two remaining bricks, then remove the outside one.”

▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ ▲ THINK ABOUT PLACEMENT

 

Placing bricks on the top of the tower can give you the upper hand. “You can sabotage the tower by balancing it on one side,” says Scott. But if your opponent succeeds, you could inherit a real wobbler.

Edited by ALICE VINCENT

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Creative Parking Canopy

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Recycled Plastic Bottles Partially Filled with Colored Water Used to Create a Parking Canopy

Recycled Plastic Bottles Partially Filled with Colored Water Used to Create a Parking Canopy street art recycling architecture

Recycled Plastic Bottles Partially Filled with Colored Water Used to Create a Parking Canopy street art recycling architecture

Recycled Plastic Bottles Partially Filled with Colored Water Used to Create a Parking Canopy street art recycling architecture

Recycled Plastic Bottles Partially Filled with Colored Water Used to Create a Parking Canopy street art recycling architecture

Recycled Plastic Bottles Partially Filled with Colored Water Used to Create a Parking Canopy street art recycling architecture

Recycled Plastic Bottles Partially Filled with Colored Water Used to Create a Parking Canopy street art recycling architecture

Designer Garth Britzman of Lincoln, Nebraska used recycled bottles filled with colored water to create stunning topographical shade canopy for a vehicle. I love how the natural shape of the plastic bottles makes the pooled water look like leaves. See more over onBehance. (via my amp goes to 11)