Monthly Archives: July 2013

L-O-V-E Makes The World Go W-E-I-R-D

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I found these funny illustrations in the net yesterday. The article was actually entitled, “Nerdy Dirty Illustrations for Nerds In Love.” But I believe that these do not only apply to the nerds because when you are trapped in the four letters of L-O-V-E, you’d be weirder than you’ve ever been.

Check the other illustrations as you scroll down below. They may sound a bit “cheesy” though but they can be really amusing. 

NerdyDirty2

 

NerdyDirty3

 

NerdyDirty4

 

NerdyDirty5

 

NerdyDirty6

 

NerdyDirty7

 

NerdyDirty8

 

NerdyDirty9

 

NerdyDirty10

 

NerdyDirty11

 

 

All illustrations created by the exceptional Nicole Martinez.

[via thecuriousbrain.com]

Street Art Utopia’s Best of 2011

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Street Art Utopia’s Best of 2011

December 13, 2011 by 

 

I couldn’t help but direct everyone to fellow public art loving blog Street Art Utopia as they have compiled a pretty decent list of the best street art of 2011. If you are just getting into the wonderful world of pasting, spraying or making the streets a more creative place, this list is a great place to start (short of  Wall and Piece). One of the best things about this genre is it’s diversity – you can decided what you find gimmicky/twee or meaningful and awe-inspiring. Street art has always been the public’s voice, and the art world has yielded success to those with great ideas and a call for change. More from the list after the jump!

 

Vintage Poison rings

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I love these!! I have one and I just can’t get enough of it!

 

“A poison ring or pillbox ring is a type of ring with a container under the bezel or inside the bezel itself that could be used to hold poison or another substance.[1] They became popular in Europe during the sixteenth century. The poison ring was used either to slip poison into an enemy’s food or drink, or to facilitate the suicide of the wearer in order to escape capture or torture.

Rings like this have been used throughout history to carry perfume, locks of hair, devotional relics, messages and other keepsakes, so they have also been known by other names. Artists would paint tiny portraits of loved ones, to be carried in what was called a “locket ring,” which was popular during the Renaissance. By the 17th century, jewelers were creating locket rings in the shape of caskets which served as mementos for mourners. These were called “funeral rings.” Rings with compartments are also called “box” rings or “socket” rings.

The Origin of Poison Rings According to Marcy Waldie, who wrote about poison rings in the October 2001 article “A Ring to Die For: Poison Rings Hold Centuries of Secrets,” from Antiques & Collecting Magazine, this type of jewelry originated in ancient days of the Far East and India. It replaced the practice of wearing keepsakes and other items in pouches around the neck. The wearing of vessel rings was so practical that it spread to other parts of Asia, the Middle East and the Mediterranean before reaching Western Europe in the Middle Ages. By then the rings were part of the “holy relic trade.” “

Thank you Wikipedia, now pretty photos 🙂

 

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